Hotels Are Beginning To Tackle The Problem of Food Waste

Hotels Are Beginning To Tackle The Problem of Food Waste
Food & Beverage

In the future, the hotel buffet may shrink in half but have more available of what guests prefer to consume

Zack Palm
  • 29 september 2017

Hotels commonly have a buffet going during the breakfast and early periods of the day available for all guests of the establishment. Knowing how many probably stay at the location, a lot of food must get made to keep the stockpiles available for as long as possible for everyone. However, how much of it gets eaten? How much goes bad? Executive Chef for the Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lawrence Eells, wanted to find out. He reached out to IDEO, international design and consulting firm, to gather data to discover how much of the food his kitchen prepared went to waste.

The IDEO team were set to measure the total amount of the food that left the kitchen and how much of this portion was consumer compared to it turning into waste. It was a quick find. Of all the food that went to the hotel guests, they only consumed half of it. Not much of the leftovers could go get donated, only 15%. This meant nearly 35% of the prepared food was scrapped.

Food_Waste_Hotels_Accure_Can_Lower.jpg
These findings were good to know, as the original goal for IDEO was to discover how Eells and his team could innovate the cooking process to save as much of the wasted food as possible. One obvious thing they discovered was the mindset of a hotel buffet: making enough to feed all of the guests. They need to know they can eat whenever they feel like it while they stayed there. Another problem was the way guests ate. They would avoid having to return to the buffet line for seconds, and instead obtain as much of their favorites as they could on one plate. Both of these issues brings about wasteful habits.

Food_Waste_Occurs_Regularly_In_Hotels.JPG
The solutions the team presented to Eells include having servers bring sample plates to guests to have the request what they’d like and preparing smaller bread portion. With a handful of changes implemented Eells and the Hyatt Regency Orlando have made have caused a 10% drop in the hotel’s food waste. In the future, hotels may act on cutting food waste by formally asking guests about their dietary preferences and when they prefer to eat. This would give the kitchens an idea of what every day would look like and have them stock up on supplies more guests prefer having.

Even if the hotel buffet gets cut in half, guests may find have the opportunity to consume more of the items they prefer eating.

Hyatt Regency Orlando | IDEO

Hotels commonly have a buffet going during the breakfast and early periods of the day available for all guests of the establishment. Knowing how many probably stay at the location, a lot of food must get made to keep the stockpiles available for as long as possible for everyone. However, how much of it gets eaten? How much goes bad? Executive Chef for the Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lawrence Eells, wanted to find out. He reached out to IDEO, international design and consulting firm, to gather data to discover how much of the food his kitchen prepared went to waste.

+Design
+Food
+food waste
+hospitality
+hotel
+ideo
+retail
+Sustainability
+Sustainability
+USA
+waste

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