The new Fitbit-linked app will keep users' money should they fail to keep their fitness goals

Lazy Jar, a new Fitbit-connected app, is seeking to capitalize on the desire for achieving fitness goals in an unconventional way. The app, which has been available for three weeks, is holding users financially accountable for not meeting their own predetermined goals.

Lazy Jar users set weekly goals, such as burning a certain number of calories or walking a certain number of steps, and they select an amount of money that will be taken if the goals are not achieved. At the end of six months, if all goals have been met, the users are refunded their entire original payment.

The app offers a powerful incentive to fulfill fitness goals, banking on the idea that nobody likes to lose money. The benefit of using Lazy Jar though, is that even “lost money” is not really lost. 80% of the money made by Lazy Jar goes toward childhood cancer research while the remaining 20% goes back to supporting the app.

Lazy Jar is free and compatible with both iPhones and Androids.

Lazy Jar

Lazy Jar, a new Fitbit-connected app, is seeking to capitalize on the desire for achieving fitness goals in an unconventional way. The app, which has been available for three weeks, is holding users financially accountable for not meeting their own predetermined goals.

Lazy Jar users set weekly goals, such as burning a certain number of calories or walking a certain number of steps, and they select an amount of money that will be taken if the goals are not achieved. At the end of six months, if all goals have been met, the users are refunded their entire original payment.