Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan's installation is a soothing response to turbulant times

Two UK-based artists are bringing some much-needed brightness to London with their new temporary installation ‘Joy and Peace.’ Using vivid colors and bold geometric shapes, Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan created the two installations as a part of London’s new Culture Mile Pop-Ups program.

‘Joy’ runs along Silk Street in central London, popping out of a 97-meter wall, its bright design standing in stark contrast to the brutalist buildings it inhabits. ‘Peace,’ meanwhile, occupies a space at the West Smithfield Rotunda Garden, complimenting the park’s natural beauty while creating a playful space for public performances.

The designers created the installation in response to the “fractious times we are living in.” Joy and Peace comprise of six symbols: the heart, representing love; the globe, representing society; the sun, representing joy; the eye, representing openness; the star, representing energy; and the flower, representing peace. Each piece was handpainted on plywood by Morag, Luke and a team of painters in her studio. The entrance walls to the Peace Pavilion and Garden also incorporate patterns developed from workshops with local schools.

Visitors can enjoy the installations now through October 20.

Morag Myerscough | Luke Morga

Two UK-based artists are bringing some much-needed brightness to London with their new temporary installation ‘Joy and Peace.’ Using vivid colors and bold geometric shapes, Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan created the two installations as a part of London’s new Culture Mile Pop-Ups program.

‘Joy’ runs along Silk Street in central London, popping out of a 97-meter wall, its bright design standing in stark contrast to the brutalist buildings it inhabits. ‘Peace,’ meanwhile, occupies a space at the West Smithfield Rotunda Garden, complimenting the park’s natural beauty while creating a playful space for public performances.