Code Like A Preschooler At This New York City Pop-Up

Code Like A Preschooler At This New York City Pop-Up
Children

A West Village pop-up shop from Primo Toys invites kids and adults to play with Cubetto, a tactile toy that teaches coding basics

Isabella Alimonti
  • 30 october 2017

This week, a New York pop-up is challenging visitors of all ages to code like a 3-year-old with a toy set designed to teach preschoolers the basics of coding without a screen. Kids and adults at Primo Toys’ temporary shop can place plastic pieces on an electronic board to program Cubetto—a smiling wooden box on wheels—to make left and right turns and travel forward.

Combined with illustrated fabric mats depicting worlds like the ocean and outer space, Cubetto lets users engage with coding, math and storytelling. Giorgia Migliaresi, who manages education outreach for Primo Toys, was doling out challenges and hints in the shop last week, but Cubetto purposefully lacks an instruction manual in order to let kids discover how it works for themselves. Children attending the pop-up, she said, tend to be much less timid about approaching the toy by trial and error than their adult counterparts.

Primo Toys originally launched Cubetto on Kickstarter, where it became the crowdfunding site’s most funded educational product to date. Adding to its accolades, Primo Toys was the New York winner of this year’s Space for Ideas competition from short-term retail marketplace Appear Here, which furnishes startups with retail space and funding for a two-week pop-up. Primo Toys opened its store on October 25 at 9 Christopher Street in Manhattan’s West Village and will remain there until November 5.

Physical retail feels like a crucial step for the direct-to-consumer business. “We’re a hardware company, and we make products that need to be touched,” said Filippo Yacob, founder of Primo Toys. “A big part of it is sharing the tool that we make with the community.”

A post shared by Primo Toys (@primotoys) on

Yacob said the pop-up is an opportunity to try out new ideas based on feedback the company has gotten from users around the world. After parents and children started outfitting Cubetto to draw on paper as it moves along, Primo Toys developed a product based on their impromptu art. At the shop, visitors can create a drawing with a Cubetto that dons a headband to hold a colored marker. Beginners might code Cubetto to outline a circle before graduating to more intricate designs.

“We have a product that’s very open-ended, that allows endless coded combinations, so all of our experiences reflect that,” Yacob said. “We let people just come up to the product [and] have some fun with it.”

Primo Toys


Lead Image: Giorgia Migliaresi at the Primo Toys pop-up | Photo by Appear Here

This week, a New York pop-up is challenging visitors of all ages to code like a 3-year-old with a toy set designed to teach preschoolers the basics of coding without a screen. Kids and adults at Primo Toys’ temporary shop can place plastic pieces on an electronic board to program Cubetto—a smiling wooden box on wheels—to make left and right turns and travel forward.

+advertising
+children
+coding
+Education
+experiential marketing
+Experiential Marketing
+Luxury
+new york city
+pop-ups
+retail
+technology
+toys
+USA

Learn About Our Membership Services

Need Research Help?
As a member you can ask us any research questions and get complimentary research assistance with a 4-day turnaround. Reports inclde stats, quotes, and best-inclass examples on research topics.
Remain Informed & Strategic
We publish several trends reports each month. By becoming a member you will have access to over 100 existing reports, plus a growing catalog of deep topical analysis and debrief-style reports so you always remain in the know.
See Trends Come To Life
Meet your peers and immerse yourself in monthly trend and innovation webinars and discounted conferences.
No search results found.