A Dutch design student has proposed an environmentally friendly solution to curb packaging waste and cost

What ingredient do you find in many, if not all, household products? Water. Laundry detergent, dish soap, shampoo, cleaning supplies—you name it—are all made from 80% water. Bearing that in mind, the weight that water adds to these bottled packages results in increased pollution from fuel waste.  Dutch design student Mirjam de Bruijn from the Design Academy of Eindhoven came up with idea of distilling each product down to its non-water ingredients to be sold as solids, called Twenty.

Simply put, once you’ve purchased the product, you can put the solid form in a reusable bottle and add water to create your desired cleaning solution. Just think: if this project of de Bruijn’s were widely adopted, the amount of plastic waste per person would dramatically be reduced, along with shipping costs.

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The packaging that de Bruijn designed is made of recyclable materials such as cardboard and reusable plastic bottles. Not only is it environmentally sound but fiscally responsible.

Twenty


Images: Mirjam de Bruijn 

What ingredient do you find in many, if not all, household products? Water. Laundry detergent, dish soap, shampoo, cleaning supplies—you name it—are all made from 80% water. Bearing that in mind, the weight that water adds to these bottled packages results in increased pollution from fuel waste.  Dutch design student Mirjam de Bruijn from the Design Academy of Eindhoven came up with idea of distilling each product down to its non-water ingredients to be sold as solids, called Twenty.

Simply put, once you’ve purchased the product, you can put the solid form in a reusable bottle and add water to create your desired cleaning solution. Just think: if this project of de Bruijn’s were widely adopted, the amount of plastic waste per person would dramatically be reduced, along with shipping costs.