A pair of Dutch designers imagine a world that produces negative emissions, starting with algae plastic for 3D printing

What’s the best way to eliminate the need for manufacturing with plastic? Developing an alternative that not only replaces it, but also helps lower greenhouse gases. Dutch designers Eric Klarenbeek and Maartje Dros were able to do this by developing an algae plastic to use in 3D printing.

Before going into a 3D printer, the dried algae material gets mixed with other natural additives and a biopolymer. However, all of the materials Klarenbeek and Dros use with the algae are locally grown and feasible for anyone to collect in their hometown. When the material completes the transformation into a 3D filament, it grants anyone with a 3D printer the capacity to create anything they need, from tableware to a garbage can.

Klarenbeek and Dros believe this algae process could bring about a revolution and urge other manufacturers to think like they do. The duo told Dezeen that they want the world focusing less on having zero emissions and instead think about producing negative emissions to bring down the already high levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Eric Klarenbeek | Maartje Dros


Images via Eric Klarenbeek

What’s the best way to eliminate the need for manufacturing with plastic? Developing an alternative that not only replaces it, but also helps lower greenhouse gases. Dutch designers Eric Klarenbeek and Maartje Dros were able to do this by developing an algae plastic to use in 3D printing.

Before going into a 3D printer, the dried algae material gets mixed with other natural additives and a biopolymer. However, all of the materials Klarenbeek and Dros use with the algae are locally grown and feasible for anyone to collect in their hometown. When the material completes the transformation into a 3D filament, it grants anyone with a 3D printer the capacity to create anything they need, from tableware to a garbage can.