A new service called Try pays the upfront cost for customers so they only pay for what they want to keep

Try is a service that lets customers try on clothes before they buy them from an online store, enabling them to order items they fancy for free so they can see what they're like before they actually pay for them. Users are charged a subscription fee and Try pays the upfront cost of the items they order. Then, once their order arrives they have a week to try out the clothing, shoes or accessories and send back any items they don’t want. If they keep anything, Try.com charges them for it.

Try believes shopping requires a human touch and that many retailers have lost sight of the human need to try things out. They explain on their website:

“Imagine if you had to pay upfront to take clothes into a fitting room. That would be insane. That is ecommerce today. This is largely because the credit card, an archaic 1950s invention, was never designed to support the online use case. That's why we've chosen to innovate on the global payments network to achieve our mission.”

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Try's technology is built directly into the Amex, MasterCard, and Visa payment networks, so it works everywhere. Customers get seven days to try on the clothes they order and only pay for what they choose to keep. Retailers send out the products like a normal order and customers return what they don't want as per the retailer's policy. They aren't charged for the things they return so they no longer have to wait for refunds.

Try initially began as a Google Chrome extension and recently launched a mobile app for iOS. You can test out Try by signing up for a 14-day free trial on their website.

Try

Try is a service that lets customers try on clothes before they buy them from an online store, enabling them to order items they fancy for free so they can see what they're like before they actually pay for them. Users are charged a subscription fee and Try pays the upfront cost of the items they order. Then, once their order arrives they have a week to try out the clothing, shoes or accessories and send back any items they don’t want. If they keep anything, Try.com charges them for it.

Try believes shopping requires a human touch and that many retailers have lost sight of the human need to try things out. They explain on their website: