Filament developed a microchip sensor to enable shipping containers and industrial equipment to interact with blockchain technology

Filament, a blockchain startup based in Nevada, has developed a microchip designed to give shipping containers and other industrial tools the ability to communicate and complete transactions through software called Blocklet. Normally, a shipping container goes through a number of parties before it arrives to its final destination and requires multiple signatures of approval along the way. The Blocklet microchip makes this process easier—and ultimately more accountable for retailers and consumers.

At the first point, a user records a series of travel requirements for the shipping container into the microchip. The microchip takes these requirements into account and organizes its trip to match these choices as closely as possible. By having the shipping container on a blockchain, it pays for itself throughout the multiple modes of transit and records its journey on an open ledger. Along the way, everyone involved in the transaction can freely track the container's travel progress on the blockchain.

The Blocklet software and microchip are currently in beta testing.

Filament


Lead Image: chuttersnap | Unsplash

Filament, a blockchain startup based in Nevada, has developed a microchip designed to give shipping containers and other industrial tools the ability to communicate and complete transactions through software called Blocklet. Normally, a shipping container goes through a number of parties before it arrives to its final destination and requires multiple signatures of approval along the way. The Blocklet microchip makes this process easier—and ultimately more accountable for retailers and consumers.