The campaign makes Burger King customers pay an exorbitant amount to get a Whopper at the speed they're used to

Burger King is teaching Americans about net neutrality, and the dangers its December repeal by the FCC poses for internet use, with a humorous video ad. In the ad, unaware customers order the fast food chain’s signature burger, the Whopper, and are met with a policy change: They either have to pay an exorbitant amount ($25.99) to get their food right away, or wait for the regular price.

Under net neutrality, internet providers are not allowed to slow down, speed up or limit access to certain sites; without it, they can start charging according to speed and content. The Burger King video explains how its MBPS system (which “of course stands for Making Burgers Per Second”) offers fast, medium, and slow MBPS, priced accordingly.

Understandably, customers get angry and demand their burgers with indignant (albeit funny) reactions, until they get the explanation at the end and speak out against the repeal of net neutrality. The video concludes with a a call to action for citizens to get involved by signing the petition to save net neutrality.

Burger King

Burger King is teaching Americans about net neutrality, and the dangers its December repeal by the FCC poses for internet use, with a humorous video ad. In the ad, unaware customers order the fast food chain’s signature burger, the Whopper, and are met with a policy change: They either have to pay an exorbitant amount ($25.99) to get their food right away, or wait for the regular price.

Under net neutrality, internet providers are not allowed to slow down, speed up or limit access to certain sites; without it, they can start charging according to speed and content. The Burger King video explains how its MBPS system (which “of course stands for Making Burgers Per Second”) offers fast, medium, and slow MBPS, priced accordingly.