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Collaborative Streaming Is Changing How People Game

Collaborative Streaming Is Changing How People Game
Gaming & Play

Live streaming and other social features are letting gamers share experiences and solve challenges together and remotely

PSFK
  • 7 february 2018

More video game studios are enabling fans to interact remotely via live-streamed shows, and giving them the chance to share their experiences with friends across social platforms. At the same time, there has been a resurgence of multiplayer games that challenge groups to work together or compete, enhancing social experiences through couch co-op.

PSFK researchers took a closer look at collaborative streams and party play in gaming. Twitch, the world’s leading live social video platform, has exploded in popularity over recent years. Primarily focusing on video game streaming, including broadcasting eSports competitions, the platform lets fans watch live streams of games and activities they are interested in and chat with streamers and other viewers around the world.

We catalogued some best-in-class examples of games and platforms that encourage gamers to collaborate and interact with each other:

Twitch 
Twitch Studios launched a live streaming reality show called Stream On that takes place across multiple channels as contestants compete throughout the week from their home streaming setups. Twitch Studios has invited up to 14 video-game broadcasters from Twitch Partners revenue-sharing program to audition to participate in the competition show. Stream On contestants face challenges designed to test important streamer skills and are evaluated by a panel of Twitch judges, in addition to viewers in Twitch chat who play a role in determining who will be eliminated. The individual deemed best at entertaining and leading a gaming community will win a grand prize of $5,000 per month for a year.

Mixer × Minecraft 
Swedish game studio Mojang has released an update that lets users live stream directly to Microsoft Mixer from within Minecraft on Android devices, Windows 10 PCs and Xbox One consoles. Users can take people on a live tour without starting a broadcast in a separate app or service first. Mixer support also lets users make aspects of their Minecraft session interactive. Viewers can vote on spawning objects (including enemies) or even change the environmental conditions. They can turn day into night to see whether they’ll survive the trip back to safety, for instance.

Snipperclips 
Snipperclips
is a sit-down Nintendo Switch game that allows two to four people to work together to solve puzzles by snipping their characters into weird shapes. Using the Joy-Con controllers, players control colorful papery beings—called Snip and Clip—who snip each other into the shapes needed to solve a variety of puzzles.

That’s You! and Knowledge is Power 
That’s You! and Knowledge is Power are two PlayStation 4 quiz show games that use smartphones as controllers. That’s You! relies on in-jokes and familiarity, with questions about who’d be the first person in your group to get up and dance at a party, or who’s the most competitive. Knowledge is Power is a razzmatazz gameshow-style general knowledge quiz, better for groups for who don’t know each other so well. Questions press players to predict each other’s behavior in different social settings, with choices made by tapping the phone in secret, and involves other smart device touch screen challenges, the ability to plot with other contestants to bring down your rivals, and a rapid-fire Grand Finale.

Gamers have more ways to interact than ever, with collaborative streams offering them the opportunity to do so remotely, and party games giving them the chance to work together or against friends who can be in the same room. For more insights, check out our recent research paper, Building the Next Gaming Experience.


Lead Image: PlayStation via YouTube

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