Overtime focuses its mobile-friendly content around the stories of young up-and-coming athletes

A recent study by the NCAA found that attendance at college sports games is declining. The study points to a larger trend emerging among younger fans who aren't attracted to the traditional way sports have been presented. Overtime, a year-old app designed to let people easily capture and edit footage from sports games, particularly high-school basketball, is hoping to attract a younger audience with its approach to delivering sports content. 

Overtime delivers content wherever younger viewers want to watch it—something other sports networks are struggling with. It has also tapped into the fact that young audiences are connecting to the stories of young athletes that might be professionals in 12 to 24 months. Some of these young digital-native athletes have more followers than professional players, which creates both interest and an entire subculture around them.

Overtime is hoping that they can give exposure to younger athletes who might be passed over by mainstream media. Stars like the Oklahoma guard Trae Young and Georgetown-bound Mac McClung are featured on the agnostic platform that goes to where younger viewers are.

Many of Overtime's videos are watched on YouTube but there is an app that allows viewers to follow specific players, especially the rising stars. The platform has gotten attention from NBA players, including Kevin Durant, which is helping to build its community. Ultimately, Overtime wants to become the trusted voice for sports for younger audiences.

Overtime


Lead Image: Overtime via Twitter

A recent study by the NCAA found that attendance at college sports games is declining. The study points to a larger trend emerging among younger fans who aren't attracted to the traditional way sports have been presented. Overtime, a year-old app designed to let people easily capture and edit footage from sports games, particularly high-school basketball, is hoping to attract a younger audience with its approach to delivering sports content. 

Overtime delivers content wherever younger viewers want to watch it—something other sports networks are struggling with. It has also tapped into the fact that young audiences are connecting to the stories of young athletes that might be professionals in 12 to 24 months. Some of these young digital-native athletes have more followers than professional players, which creates both interest and an entire subculture around them.