Pour Reception changes how people interact with everyday objects with its new product activated by glasses of liquid

For decades stereos have functioned in the same old way, using variations on buttons and dials to help listeners find music. Pour Reception is looking to make the process a little more engaging and fun by having listeners pour and touch water in order to control the device. Created by artists and designers Tore Knudsen, Simone Okholm Hansen and Victor Permild, the stereo uses two glasses on top of a pressure-sensitive interface in order to perform basic functions. Pouring water from one glass to another changes the frequencies, touching the glass affects the sound quality and touching the water changes the volume. The technology is also used in smartphone design:  Objects emit micro amounts of electricity and touch disrupts the signal,  allowing technology to register the sensation.

The project is less about examining what's possible from a technological perspective and more about experimenting with design. “It is possible to augment our physical world in ways that challenge our perceptions of the objects we interact with. In this project, we aim to change the user’s perception of what a glass is—both culturally and technically,” the team writes on the project page. “Pour Reception is an example of how technology can give new meaning to our cultural and functional perception of objects.”

Pour Reception

For decades stereos have functioned in the same old way, using variations on buttons and dials to help listeners find music. Pour Reception is looking to make the process a little more engaging and fun by having listeners pour and touch water in order to control the device. Created by artists and designers Tore Knudsen, Simone Okholm Hansen and Victor Permild, the stereo uses two glasses on top of a pressure-sensitive interface in order to perform basic functions. Pouring water from one glass to another changes the frequencies, touching the glass affects the sound quality and touching the water changes the volume. The technology is also used in smartphone design:  Objects emit micro amounts of electricity and touch disrupts the signal,  allowing technology to register the sensation.