Japanese researchers have created a wearable display to ease the burden on home healthcare systems

Japanese research group Takao Someya, part of the University of Tokyo’s School of Engineering, has invented a super-stretchable electronic skin that easily adheres to a patient’s body and continuously tracks vital signs like heart rate, wirelessly feeding the information into a remote electrocardiogram.

The display is just 1 millimeter thick and consists of a 16 x 24 array of micro LEDs mounted on a rubber sheet. The material is light and flexible enough to allow for constant wear without irritation for up to a week. The idea behind the device was to facilitate caretaking in societies with large elderly populations, offering at-home, non-invasive healthcare monitoring. Researchers project that the tracker will be on the market in three years time, after undergoing further optimization.

Takao Someya


Images: 2018 Takao Someya Research Group

Japanese research group Takao Someya, part of the University of Tokyo’s School of Engineering, has invented a super-stretchable electronic skin that easily adheres to a patient’s body and continuously tracks vital signs like heart rate, wirelessly feeding the information into a remote electrocardiogram.

The display is just 1 millimeter thick and consists of a 16 x 24 array of micro LEDs mounted on a rubber sheet. The material is light and flexible enough to allow for constant wear without irritation for up to a week. The idea behind the device was to facilitate caretaking in societies with large elderly populations, offering at-home, non-invasive healthcare monitoring. Researchers project that the tracker will be on the market in three years time, after undergoing further optimization.