In addition to putting brand values on display, a wave of advertising is bringing people with opposing opinions together

A number of brands have been using marketing campaigns to put their core values on display in relation to important topics, like racial and gender equality—with mixed success. But some have recently approached thorny issues by attempting to foster a dialog between people with vastly different beliefs.

PSFK researchers explored some of the ways advertising has tried to connect consumers with different perspectives:

The​ ​Outpost 
New​ ​York-based​ ​marketing​ ​firm​ ​The​ ​Participation​ ​Agency​ ​funded​ ​an​ ​ambitious​ ​project called​ ​The​ ​Outpost,​ ​a​ ​community​ ​space​ ​in​ ​El​ ​Paso,​ ​Texas​ ​that​ ​aims​ ​to​ ​connect​ ​traveling musicians​ ​and​ ​other​ ​creatives​ ​with​ ​American​ ​populations​ ​with​ ​varying​ ​political​ ​perspectives.​ ​​The 3,500-square-foot​ ​space​ ​includes​ ​a​ ​recording​ ​studio,​ ​adult​ ​jungle​ ​gym,​ ​a​ ​wall​ ​of free​ ​snacks,​ ​shoes​ ​and​ ​beauty​ ​products,​ ​a​ ​hair​ ​salon,​ ​and​ ​even​ ​a​ ​Danish-style outdoor hot​ ​tub​ .

Heineken 
The beer brand's “Worlds​ ​Apart”​ ​ad​ ​pairs​ ​people​ ​who​ ​hold​ ​opposing​ ​views​ ​on​ ​social​ ​issues​ ​like​ ​feminism, climate​ ​change​ ​and​ ​transgender​ ​rights. The duos complete a team-building exercise before finding out about each other's viewpoints and ultimately discussing their beliefs over a drink.

Kind 
The Kind Foundation's “Pop​ ​Your​ ​Bubble”​ ​Facebook​ ​app​ ​connects​ ​people​ ​with​ ​different​ ​opinions on political and social issues to break the echo chamber effect of social media.

A growing proportion of brands are taking it upon themselves to bring people together. For more on this topic, check out our recent research paper, Inspiring Sustainable Peace.

A number of brands have been using marketing campaigns to put their core values on display in relation to important topics, like racial and gender equality—with mixed success. But some have recently approached thorny issues by attempting to foster a dialog between people with vastly different beliefs.

PSFK researchers explored some of the ways advertising has tried to connect consumers with different perspectives:

The​ ​Outpost  New​ ​York-based​ ​marketing​ ​firm​ ​The​ ​Participation​ ​Agency​ ​funded​ ​an​ ​ambitious​ ​project called​ ​The​ ​Outpost,​ ​a​ ​community​ ​space​ ​in​ ​El​ ​Paso,​ ​Texas​ ​that​ ​aims​ ​to​ ​connect​ ​traveling musicians​ ​and​ ​other​ ​creatives​ ​with​ ​American​ ​populations​ ​with​ ​varying​ ​political​ ​perspectives.​ ​​The 3,500-square-foot​ ​space​ ​includes​ ​a​ ​recording​ ​studio,​ ​adult​ ​jungle​ ​gym,​ ​a​ ​wall​ ​of free​ ​snacks,​ ​shoes​ ​and​ ​beauty​ ​products,​ ​a​ ​hair​ ​salon,​ ​and​ ​even​ ​a​ ​Danish-style outdoor hot​ ​tub​ .