The app promoted its peer-matching service at Austin's SXSW Festival with special face-to-face opportunities to foster relationships

SXSW was the launching pad for an activation from Bumble,  an app that connects women looking for friendships, work-ships or romantic relationships. Preacher, a creative shop in Austin, built the space that featured several rooms conducive to chatting, 5-minute dating intros and networking, reflecting Bumble’s three app features—Bumble Bizz, Bumble BFF and Bumble Date.

Bumble’s marketing director Chelsea Cane Maclin explained the goal of the app’s experience at SXSW: “Because Bumble is focused on in-real-life connections, it’s important to be able to provide experiences to allow our users to interact with what we believe in and what we want to accomplish, so this is a manifestation of that.” Maclin continued,  “When you’re trying to end misogyny, encourage online accountability and empower people though kindness and respect, that’s a pretty lofty goal, so we feel like we have to bring something more meaningful and education-based into our own activation at SXSW.”

With empowering messages wrought in neon and bright pop colors, the activation engendered an energy and excitement around Bumble’s mission. Mixed in with attendees was a roster from FlyteVu of talented artists, activists and speakers, like Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe, actress Gina Rodriguez, singer Keke Palmer, director Yoruba Richen, political commentator Sally Kohn and poet Cleo Wade.

Bumble


Lead image via Facebook

SXSW was the launching pad for an activation from Bumble,  an app that connects women looking for friendships, work-ships or romantic relationships. Preacher, a creative shop in Austin, built the space that featured several rooms conducive to chatting, 5-minute dating intros and networking, reflecting Bumble’s three app features—Bumble Bizz, Bumble BFF and Bumble Date.

Bumble’s marketing director Chelsea Cane Maclin explained the goal of the app’s experience at SXSW: “Because Bumble is focused on in-real-life connections, it’s important to be able to provide experiences to allow our users to interact with what we believe in and what we want to accomplish, so this is a manifestation of that.” Maclin continued,  “When you’re trying to end misogyny, encourage online accountability and empower people though kindness and respect, that’s a pretty lofty goal, so we feel like we have to bring something more meaningful and education-based into our own activation at SXSW.”