CXI 2018: Creating Multi-Sensory Experiences For Emotional Impact

CXI 2018: Creating Multi-Sensory Experiences For Emotional Impact
Design

Food technologist, experience designer and multimedia artist Emilie Baltz will share her expertise in sensory storytelling at PSFK's CXI 2018 conference on May 18

PSFK
  • 10 april 2018

As consumers seek out the experiential, the design process demands more from creatives than ever before. With advancements in immersive technology and brand activations that encompass disciplines like food, visual art and meditation, multi-sensory experiences are becoming the norm—and few are more prepared to meet this demand than Emilie Baltz, the food technologist, experience designer and multimedia artist. Case and point: She once created a musical symphony using conductive ice cream that produces different tones and baselines when licked.

We’re thrilled to welcome Emilie, a previous conference speaker, back to the PSFK stage for CXI 2018 on May 18 in New York City. In anticipation of her talk, we looked back at some of our favorite insights that we’ve heard from Emilie in years past, including what inspired her to work with food as a storytelling medium:

Food is unique in that it is the most “live material” designers can use. It is life, and begs the creation of community, empathy and sensual interaction for its success. Within this tactile landscape, it leaves room for failure and experimentation as a creative practice, while inviting intimate and emotional communication in its consumption.

These acts ignite both our imagination and memory while stimulating our bodies, serving as powerful means of creating physical touchpoints for emotional content. As we move towards a Jetsonian future of technology and connectivity, the study of food experience can reveal sustainable, human-centric models of interaction that, in their bridging of the emotional and physical, offer healthy metaphors for connections between the virtual and the real.

When Emilie spoke at PSFK’s conference in 2014, she drew from her L.O.V.E. Foodbook project, combining history, psychology and physicality to explore the much-discussed topic of food as aphrodisiac.

At the time, Emilie told PSFK:

For the past two years I researched aphrodisiacs for the Museum of Sex in New York City. During this time, friends, colleagues and strangers foamed at the mouth when they heard of my project. Hundreds of times, I was asked for the “holy grail,” that special, secret ingredient with the power to elicit desire; yet, as deeply as I dug, the more convinced I became of its in-existence.

Certain foods do have chemical make-ups that can stimulate physical reactions, at times even slight sexual attraction, but when combing through the recipes of history, it became transparent that these things we call aphrodisiac are, in fact, more grounded in storytelling than calorie count. Modern-day scientific studies certainly support this—revealing inconclusive data in the relationship of food science to desire—but, somehow, we still attempt to woo with boxes of chocolates and platters of oysters.

Why? Because for centuries humans have woven myths and folklore that do more than stimulate our loins, they capture our head and hearts. This is what the power of storytelling can do: transform a single ingredient into a full, complex and delicious drama.

The power of storytelling will only feel more acute as it reaches new heights of immersion—and this has implications for retail, advertising and product design across just about every industry.

Join Emilie and other pioneering speakers for CXI 2018 on May 18 in New York City—details and tickets available here.


Lead Image: Emilie Baltz | Photo by Tim Wilson

As consumers seek out the experiential, the design process demands more from creatives than ever before. With advancements in immersive technology and brand activations that encompass disciplines like food, visual art and meditation, multi-sensory experiences are becoming the norm—and few are more prepared to meet this demand than Emilie Baltz, the food technologist, experience designer and multimedia artist. Case and point: She once created a musical symphony using conductive ice cream that produces different tones and baselines when licked.

+Arts & Culture
+arts & culture
+Brand Introduction
+children
+CXI 2018
+Design
+Emilie Baltz
+Entertainment
+experiential marketing
+Experiential Marketing
+Food
+Public
+retail
+storytelling
+technology
+USA
+work

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