Part of a six-month pilot, these public transport vehicles are free of drivers and steering wheels, relying instead on a GPS system and traffic sensors

Since the beginning of 2018, Stockholm's tech-oriented Krista district has offered two 12-passenger shuttle buses free of cost for the public to use, with one significant twist: They have no driver or even a steering wheel, only an attendant to monitor the autonomous vehicle's activity or take control if needed. The launch of the driverless buses was part of a research project from Ericsson, a six-month pilot that aims to test out the feasibility of automated buses as an integral part of the Swedish capital's transportation network.

The shuttles route their trajectories using a GPS system and a range of sensors that detect bus stops and traffic lights, eliminating the need for a steering wheel altogether. Currently the buses max out at 24 kilometers per hour, offering perhaps not the speediest commute but ensuring safe city driving. Ultimately, Swedish transport authorities hope for a successful test run of the autonomous vehicles, as a large-scale implementation could drastically reduce cars on the road and associated pollution.

Ericsson


Lead Image: Ericsson via Facebook

Since the beginning of 2018, Stockholm's tech-oriented Krista district has offered two 12-passenger shuttle buses free of cost for the public to use, with one significant twist: They have no driver or even a steering wheel, only an attendant to monitor the autonomous vehicle's activity or take control if needed. The launch of the driverless buses was part of a research project from Ericsson, a six-month pilot that aims to test out the feasibility of automated buses as an integral part of the Swedish capital's transportation network.