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These Greeting Cards Are Cheap Gateways To AR Technology

These Greeting Cards Are Cheap Gateways To AR Technology
AR & VR

For under $6, augmented reality greeting cards can animate, sing and even reveal a hidden message

Leo Lutero
  • 4 april 2018

For just under $6, you can give someone an augmented reality experience. Kineticards is building AR-enabled greeting cards that animate off of the page as soon as a recipient views them through a smartphone.

To see the AR, the receiver must download the Kineticards app. Then they simply point the camera to the card, and the graphics start moving. The app maps the greeting card’s illustration and then replaces the static images with a charming animation. The technology is straightforward, has an emotional appeal and, at a price point under $10, they’re not hard to obtain. The AR dimension can also add interesting layers of information to the card. Gender reveal cards, for example, only show the word “boy” or “girl” once viewed through the app.

The simple two-step process to use makes Kineticards a great way to experience AR. They’re simple, engaging, affordable, and, most importantly, bring humanity into the technology.

Kineticards

+augmented reality
+Entertainment
+greeting cards
+Kineticards
+mobile
+product experience

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