Media companies like the Weather Channel have adopted a feed-style interface, looking to appeal to consumers accustomed to engaging with content on social

Though Facebook has come under fire for spreading “fake news,” two-thirds of Americans say they get at least some of their news from social feeds. Media companies are starting to take a cue from the format: The Weather Company, which includes the Weather Channel, has fully adopted the content discovery platform Taboola as a publishing arm for its content.

Taboola's Facebook-like interface allows Weather Co. to broadcast paid and owned content in one feed. Since fully launching on Taboola, Weather Co. said it has seen a huge increase in engagement, citing an average RPM increase of 158% to 353% for certain pieces of content. The Taboola feed shows content in a card-like manner, in an ongoing vertical scroll like those that readers have grown accustomed to in social apps.

“There's been an uptick in engagement and click through,” Sheri Bachstein, global head of consumer business at Weather Co., told AdAge. “It's amazing when you track how much people are scrolling and how far they will go.”

Taboola

Though Facebook has come under fire for spreading “fake news,” two-thirds of Americans say they get at least some of their news from social feeds. Media companies are starting to take a cue from the format: The Weather Company, which includes the Weather Channel, has fully adopted the content discovery platform Taboola as a publishing arm for its content.

Taboola's Facebook-like interface allows Weather Co. to broadcast paid and owned content in one feed. Since fully launching on Taboola, Weather Co. said it has seen a huge increase in engagement, citing an average RPM increase of 158% to 353% for certain pieces of content. The Taboola feed shows content in a card-like manner, in an ongoing vertical scroll like those that readers have grown accustomed to in social apps.