Customers won't have to leave their cars to retrieve their purchases

Target announced that it will introduce drive-up service to hundreds of its stores in a bid to make the brick-and-mortar experience as convenient as online shopping. Customers will simply place their order using the Target app and wait in a designated parking space outside of the store. Employees will then hand-deliver the purchases, which are available about two hours after the order is placed.

Stores near the company's headquarters of Minneapolis adopted the service this past fall, and the retailer is not the only one who's been experimenting with the concept. Last spring, Amazon opened two grocery stores with curbside pickup in Seattle, and Walmart began testing an automated kiosk in Oklahoma City that allowed customers to assemble their order online and pull up to retrieve it. By the end of the year, Target hopes to implement the service in a thousand more stores across the country.

Target

Target announced that it will introduce drive-up service to hundreds of its stores in a bid to make the brick-and-mortar experience as convenient as online shopping. Customers will simply place their order using the Target app and wait in a designated parking space outside of the store. Employees will then hand-deliver the purchases, which are available about two hours after the order is placed.

Stores near the company's headquarters of Minneapolis adopted the service this past fall, and the retailer is not the only one who's been experimenting with the concept. Last spring, Amazon opened two grocery stores with curbside pickup in Seattle, and Walmart began testing an automated kiosk in Oklahoma City that allowed customers to assemble their order online and pull up to retrieve it. By the end of the year, Target hopes to implement the service in a thousand more stores across the country.