The portability of the instrument makes it easier to implement in any operating room, and at a reduced cost and discomfort to hospitals and patients alike

Researchers at the University of Toronto are using 3D printers to create new strips of healthy skin that may eventually cover wounds and possibly replace the use of skin grafts. Unlike skin grafts, 3D-printed skin can cover wounds completely, which will not only help with the healing process but also prevent infections. In the past, 3D printers have been too bulky for the operating rooms, but this handled machine is small and portable, making it a more practical option.

According to Fast Company, the machine prints a “bio-ink” gel that is made of skin cells, collagen and fibrin, a particular compound that can treat wounds.

“You have the handheld instrument that can be sterilized, and then you have these custom cartridges that are single use and in touch with the patient, and they can be scalably manufactured,” Axel Günther, engineering professor at the University of Toronto, told Fast Company. “So instead of having one bulky instrument that’s really expensive, you have a much less expensive type of instrument, you just order more of these cartridges.”

University of Toronto


Lead Image: Liz Do | University of Toronto

Researchers at the University of Toronto are using 3D printers to create new strips of healthy skin that may eventually cover wounds and possibly replace the use of skin grafts. Unlike skin grafts, 3D-printed skin can cover wounds completely, which will not only help with the healing process but also prevent infections. In the past, 3D printers have been too bulky for the operating rooms, but this handled machine is small and portable, making it a more practical option.

According to Fast Company, the machine prints a “bio-ink” gel that is made of skin cells, collagen and fibrin, a particular compound that can treat wounds.