For its most recent issue, the magazine steered clear of traditional paper stock and glossy photo sets, instead using Intel tech to feature a story about UAVs with a hovering array of light-show UAVs, shot by UAVs

Time Magazine’s latest cover reached a height of 328 feet and imitated the publication’s famous design using tech company Intel ‘s light-show drones—the same ones that were used for the olympics show. The 958 UAVs lit up the night sky in Folsom, California,  forming the magazine’s outline and logo at the top. Completing the mise-en-abyme theme, the photograph of the spectacle was itself shot by another drone.

Time partnered with Intel to create the display, which formed the publication’s first cover to be shot by the hovering devices. Intel’s drones appear as firework-like dots in the sky, and can be programmed to form a wide array of shapes and designs.

The magazine’s 95-year history proves that it can evolve with the changing times, and creating a real-life activation of its famous aesthetic marks not only an innovative integration of art and technology, but also functions as a creative way to draw attention to the magazine while making a point about the ubiquity of technology like drones in today’s world.

Time

Time Magazine’s latest cover reached a height of 328 feet and imitated the publication’s famous design using tech company Intel ‘s light-show drones—the same ones that were used for the olympics show. The 958 UAVs lit up the night sky in Folsom, California,  forming the magazine’s outline and logo at the top. Completing the mise-en-abyme theme, the photograph of the spectacle was itself shot by another drone.

Time partnered with Intel to create the display, which formed the publication’s first cover to be shot by the hovering devices. Intel’s drones appear as firework-like dots in the sky, and can be programmed to form a wide array of shapes and designs.