Takeoff offers a complete solution to retailers that couldn't otherwise promise same-day delivery or pick-up options to their customers, helping local or smaller businesses compete with the likes of Amazon Prime and Wholefoods

The grocery delivery market has become very competitive, and the entrance of massive retailers like Walmart and Target into the space has caused traditional grocers to reconsider their offerings and services. This is why a start-up called Takeoff developed a system to aid businesses that lack the size or infrastructure to offer same-day delivery.

After partnering with a retailer, Takeoff takes care of fulfillment within the store. Co-founders Jose Vicente Aguerrevere and Max Pedro explained that these strategically-planned centers feature robotics and require 6,000 to 10,000 square feet, which amounts to “an eighth or less” in terms of a grocery store’s typical size.

Once customers place a grocery order via the app, they are presented with several options for retrieval. They can pick up their purchases at a drive-through created by Takeoff for the store, or specify a two-hour window for home delivery.

As technology continues to create shifts in the grocery industry, Takeoff addresses a major challenge by arming smaller retailers with the technology they need to compete with larger stores. The startup expects to open its first fulfillment center this coming fall.

Takeoff


Lead image: online grocery shopping service concept stock photo from Altstock Productions/Shutterstock

The grocery delivery market has become very competitive, and the entrance of massive retailers like Walmart and Target into the space has caused traditional grocers to reconsider their offerings and services. This is why a start-up called Takeoff developed a system to aid businesses that lack the size or infrastructure to offer same-day delivery.

After partnering with a retailer, Takeoff takes care of fulfillment within the store. Co-founders Jose Vicente Aguerrevere and Max Pedro explained that these strategically-planned centers feature robotics and require 6,000 to 10,000 square feet, which amounts to “an eighth or less” in terms of a grocery store’s typical size.