How Brands Are Enabling Seamless Wishlist Creation

How Brands Are Enabling Seamless Wishlist Creation
Retail

From easy-to-incorporate browser extensions to mobile apps that let users swipe left or right, brands like Amazon and Google are inventing convenient and useful ways for online shoppers to organize and group items they're interested in

PSFK
  • 1 august 2018

Online shopping is a double-edged sword: While it provides convenience, sometimes the plethora of options can hinder rather than facilitate consumers’ browsing and decision-making process. That’s where wishlists can be useful, helping shoppers to not only keep neat and tidy the best options they’ve viewed, but also to help them share those options with others to help them decide or to send a hint.

This is why brands are focusing on removing the friction from creating wishlists, optimizing the process to integrate into existing browsing behavior or fall in line with mobile shopping behaviors, including swipe-to-like interfaces and scan-to-add integrations with the smartphone camera. Here’s how four businesses are making it easier than ever for customers to keep track of and collate items they love:

Amazon Assistant
E-commerce company Amazon offers a browser extension, Amazon Assistant, that lets customers add products from nearly any website to their universal registry or wishlist. Customers can easily compare competitors’ prices and receive notifications on special offers.

BJ’s Wholesale Club
Club store BJ’s has introduced a wishlist function to its mobile app that allows uses to build their wishlists by swiping. The app uses machine learning to present users with a personalized selection of products and allows them to easily build their wishlists by swiping right to accept the suggestion or left to reject it, a behavior that has been popularized by online dating apps.

Scandit
Barcode scanner company Scandit has launched Barcode Scanner SDK for the Web, a browser-based barcode scanner that allows consumers to use the camera on their phones, tablets or computers to scan barcodes directly into their browsers and add it to their wishlist or registry, without the need to download a special app.

Google
Google introduced a visual recognition tool called Style Match, which uses Google Lens to let users take pictures of clothing and then offers up similar, shop-able items from around the internet. Android users point their phone at a home decor or fashion item, and Style Match finds and surfaces other products like it.

Reinventing the wishlist to make it a more useful tool for shoppers is just one way that brands are transforming their interfaces and services to enhance the gifting experience. For more ways that retailers are improving how people buy for and give to others, see PSFK’s report The New Gifting Experience.


Lead image: smart phone online shopping stock photo from Stanisic Vladmir/Shutterstock

Online shopping is a double-edged sword: While it provides convenience, sometimes the plethora of options can hinder rather than facilitate consumers’ browsing and decision-making process. That’s where wishlists can be useful, helping shoppers to not only keep neat and tidy the best options they’ve viewed, but also to help them share those options with others to help them decide or to send a hint.

+amazon
+chat a researcher
+Features
+gifts
+Google
+new gifting experience
+report
+retail
+Shopper Assistance
+trend
+Virtual Commerce
+Wishlist

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