The AR brand activation allowed participants to test out Nike's React running shoes on a custom-built treadmill and produce a real-time avatar of their moves

Nike developed an immersive real-time video game called Game of Go that allowed runners to try the new Nike React running shoe on a custom-built treadmill installation, pushing their speed and reflexes. The goal of the brand activation was to bring the innovative React technology to life in a visually compelling way.

To do so, the brand developed a video game that allowed players to meet their “inner-runner”: Participants were able to create their own running avatar and experience the shoe in real-time, exploring a world of foam, bubbles and shaggy hair. Three treadmills were created and installed on Microsoft Square in Los Angeles, on which skeletal points of each player were motion-tracked to register their moves while running a 400-meter virtual race. 3D rendering techniques seamlessly converted the players’ motions into a real-time animation.

The activation was shared with a worldwide audience through the world’s first Snappable game. With a Snapchat Augmented Reality Lens, remote participants could play Game of Go on their phones. The three-day Game of Go reached 4.5 million TV impressions, 1.5 million out of home impressions and 25.6 million digital impressions through the Snapchat AR game.

Nike


Lead image: Nike Los Angeles via Twitter

Nike developed an immersive real-time video game called Game of Go that allowed runners to try the new Nike React running shoe on a custom-built treadmill installation, pushing their speed and reflexes. The goal of the brand activation was to bring the innovative React technology to life in a visually compelling way.

To do so, the brand developed a video game that allowed players to meet their “inner-runner”: Participants were able to create their own running avatar and experience the shoe in real-time, exploring a world of foam, bubbles and shaggy hair. Three treadmills were created and installed on Microsoft Square in Los Angeles, on which skeletal points of each player were motion-tracked to register their moves while running a 400-meter virtual race. 3D rendering techniques seamlessly converted the players’ motions into a real-time animation.