Increasing awareness of health and wellness is driving interest among consumers in daily health monitoring, and brands are responding with connected apparel and wearables

Brands are implementing wearable technology in apparel, designing products with features like ECG and heart beat monitoring capabilities. These wares have the ability to connect to companion apps, providing consumer insights into their health and even alert related parties as needed.  

Whether the clothes are made for athletic training or infant monitoring, brands are understanding the importance of developing products that go beyond the simple wearing capabilities of apparel. Here’s how retailers are extending the purpose of their products and giving consumers peace of mind:

Owlet
Infant tech company Owlet created smart baby socks that monitor heart rate and oxygen levels and send notifications if anything should go wrong, giving parents peace of mind while they sleep. The socks use clinically proven pulse oximetry and connect to a base station that glows green to illustrate that everything is okay, but uses lights, sounds, and app notifications if heart rate or oxygen levels are too high or low.

Emglare
Emglare has created a line of smart clothing that monitors ECG and heartbeat and connects to a companion mobile app to gives the wearers a sense of how their heart is faring. When worn, the app automatically sends a notification if the heart rate is determined to be higher than normal, and can also be programmed to inform a healthcare provider or family members about such events.

SUPA
SUPA designed a sports bra with a built-in heart rate monitor that uses blockchain technology and artificial intelligence to not only tracks workout performance and pinpoint optimal training heart rate zones, but rewards wearers with tokens for sharing their lifestyle data. The smart bra works with a companion app, called Supa.AI, which Supa.AI app tracks how a wearer’s workout is going and gives them feedback on where they can improve their performance. The app also pays users with Supa tokens for their data, which stakeholders in health can buy through contextualized SUPA Kits.

These are just a few examples of brands and retailers using technology to extend the use value of their products. For more ideas, see PSFK’s report Applying Connected Technologies To Augmented Fashion.

Brands are implementing wearable technology in apparel, designing products with features like ECG and heart beat monitoring capabilities. These wares have the ability to connect to companion apps, providing consumer insights into their health and even alert related parties as needed.  

Whether the clothes are made for athletic training or infant monitoring, brands are understanding the importance of developing products that go beyond the simple wearing capabilities of apparel. Here’s how retailers are extending the purpose of their products and giving consumers peace of mind: