Could Implanted MicroChips Be The Next Evolution In Seamless Consumer Transactions?

Could Implanted MicroChips Be The Next Evolution In Seamless Consumer Transactions?
Retail

Countries like Sweden are already implementing RFID technology, and could represent the next step in optimizing frictionless convenience for all transactions, from using public transportation and accessing social media to paying for goods

Jiwon Kim
  • 6 november 2018

Thousands of people in Sweden have had microchips, also known as RFID chips, stored into their hands. The point of the technology is to add convenience to a wearer’s life, permitting them faster access to their homes, offices and even where they work out. All it takes is a swipe of a hand against a digital reader, immediately granting the person access.

Additionally, the chips have the ability to store one’s contact, social media information, emergency contact details and even e-tickets for transportation and some events within Sweden. The chips themselves are around 5mm, making it easy to insert through a simple procedure that costs around $180. They are usually placed above the thumb through a syringe. A growing demand has led to a waitlist of Swedes waiting to get a chip implemented as the country heads towards becoming a cashless society.

This practice also begs the question, as consumers become more attuned to convenience, of whether the chips could be a way to quickly purchase items on the go. In the states, Amazon Go is already continually iterating on the consumer experience in the physical retail space. However, with recent data breaches and other privacy concerns, the concept of inserting and implementing microchips in human hands could prove cause for concern.

Microchip proponents state that the current technology does not have the ability to monitor at all because it does not have the ability to send any signals. Moreover, this technology could make it even more convenient for people to utilize transportation and purchase goods, potentially serving as the next step in an increasingly cashless, checkout-free, digitally-enabled world.

NPR


Lead image: businessman touching glowing CPU and electronics circuit stock photo from Wichy/Shutterstock

Thousands of people in Sweden have had microchips, also known as RFID chips, stored into their hands. The point of the technology is to add convenience to a wearer’s life, permitting them faster access to their homes, offices and even where they work out. All it takes is a swipe of a hand against a digital reader, immediately granting the person access.

+Amazon Go
+cashless
+microchip
+retail
+RFID
+Shopper education & assistance
+technology
+Transactions & Payments

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