To prevent damage caused by overcrowding of its natural sites, Jackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board is encouraging visitors to use its geotag "Keep Jackson Hole Wild" instead of exact locations as part of its increased sustainability plans

Jackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board is taking a stand against the dangers Instagram is posing to national parks and wildlife areas with a new geotagging campaign. In this digital age, Instagram has become one of the driving forces in social media and #nature is one of its top hashtags. The danger in this, which the team atJackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board in Wyoming have noticed: Geotagging and hashtagging certain places in national parks has begun to cause a lot of overcrowding and subsequent damage.

Instead of letting people geotag all over its park, the Jackson Hole board has created the Tag Responsibly initiative, which it hopes will help make people more conscious about the effects their social media practices have on the natural world. Instead of being able to tag an exact location within the valley to share with friends and followers, visitors will be able to select the tag“Tag Responsibly: Keep Jackson Hole Wild.”

The tourism board hopes its creative use of geotagging will help support its overarching sustainability measures, including distributing reusable “Stay Wild” bags to travelers deplaning at Jackson Hole Airport as well as intentions to incorporate kiosks that encourage visitors to use public transportation, recycle and more.

Jackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board


Lead image: taking photo in a snowy landscape stock photo from cate_89/Shutterstock

Jackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board is taking a stand against the dangers Instagram is posing to national parks and wildlife areas with a new geotagging campaign. In this digital age, Instagram has become one of the driving forces in social media and #nature is one of its top hashtags. The danger in this, which the team atJackson Hole Travel & Tourism Board in Wyoming have noticed: Geotagging and hashtagging certain places in national parks has begun to cause a lot of overcrowding and subsequent damage.