Myer is using RFID to enhance its inventory transparency and accuracy as online sales continue to soar and consistency with in-store stock becomes imperative

Australian mega retailer Myer recently implemented radio frequency identification (RFID) tags to better track its inventory as its online sales grow. The RFID test run began in the brand's Melbourne flagship location, where a popular electronics maker served as the test for the Checkpoint Systems technology.

Myer is hoping that RFID will help better track its own inventory and help reduce stock loss. When new shipments of the electronics were brought to the Myer location, they were scanned in using the RFID and UPS barcodes and all inventory was checked against a manifest before being placed in the secure in-store location. After purchase, the product was automatically retired from the inventory list via an RFID reader.

The results of this test run resulted in far less employee time spent taking inventory from two and a half hours to 15 minutes, daily. The boost in efficiency also led to a near 100% inventory accuracy. Accordingly, the retailer plans to continue investing in the RFID technology over the current new year.

Myer

Checkpoint Systems


Lead image: Myer department store stock photo from TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock

Australian mega retailer Myer recently implemented radio frequency identification (RFID) tags to better track its inventory as its online sales grow. The RFID test run began in the brand's Melbourne flagship location, where a popular electronics maker served as the test for the Checkpoint Systems technology.

Myer is hoping that RFID will help better track its own inventory and help reduce stock loss. When new shipments of the electronics were brought to the Myer location, they were scanned in using the RFID and UPS barcodes and all inventory was checked against a manifest before being placed in the secure in-store location. After purchase, the product was automatically retired from the inventory list via an RFID reader.