Homecore's Paris popup is a case study in dynamic interior store design using simple and cheap materials, referencing Newtonian physics and graffiti street art

What does it take these days to create a memorable store design experience? A big budget, expensive technology, grandiose architecture? For Homecore, France's oldest streetwear brand, its latest popup shop on the Champs-Elysées in Paris only took an idea and some paint.

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Challenged with creating the store design was Studio Malka Architecture and the resulting space combines two seemingly unrelated ideas. The first is the brightly hued color palette inspired by the logo colors on Krylon's spray paint cans, considered a heritage brand among graffiti artists. The reference to graffiti is a nod to the creative side of streetwear and the idea of finding an individualistic style.

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How the colors were applied in the space comes from the second idea that references Newtonian physics, in particular Newton's prism. Each of the seven window and door portals on the exterior was treated as a separate color prism. As each of the primary colors of ‘light' extends into the space, they begin to cross each other and create secondary hues. The resulting patterns add a dynamic and slightly technical element to the interior.

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The Homecore popup shows that there's still room to create eye-catching store interiors using very little more than paint. What elevates this application, however, is the context of the idea and how it relates to the culture the brand aims to serve.

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Homecore

Photos: Studio Malka Architecture

What does it take these days to create a memorable store design experience? A big budget, expensive technology, grandiose architecture? For Homecore, France's oldest streetwear brand, its latest popup shop on the Champs-Elysées in Paris only took an idea and some paint.

Challenged with creating the store design was Studio Malka Architecture and the resulting space combines two seemingly unrelated ideas. The first is the brightly hued color palette inspired by the logo colors on Krylon's spray paint cans, considered a heritage brand among graffiti artists. The reference to graffiti is a nod to the creative side of streetwear and the idea of finding an individualistic style.