IKEA Israel created thirteen simple additions to its furniture, like zippers and grippers, as well as accompanying video content to help customers with disabilities better use its products

Despite its accessible price point, Ikea's sleek, minimalist furniture can presents difficulties for use by consumers with varying levels of abilities. The Swedish furniture giant is looking to help support its customers by offering small devices that “hack” its furniture and make it easier to use.

Entitled ThisAbles, these products include couch lifts, light-levers, easy-access handles to add on to handle-less drawers and ten other designs that fit into popular Ikea items to make them easier for others to use. They are currently being worked on by Ikea Israel, in collaboration with nonprofits Milbat and Access Israel.

To show off these new helpful tools, the brand also launched videos showing people with disabilities using the products with the adjustments, highlighting their usefulness. While IKEA currently offers thirteen products, the retailer appears open to more in the future, stating “We do not guarantee that we will be able to find a solution for every need, but we promise to try.”

Watch how one of these hacks work in the video below:

ThisAbles


Lead image: stock photos from SpeedKingz/Shutterstock

Despite its accessible price point, Ikea's sleek, minimalist furniture can presents difficulties for use by consumers with varying levels of abilities. The Swedish furniture giant is looking to help support its customers by offering small devices that “hack” its furniture and make it easier to use.

Entitled ThisAbles, these products include couch lifts, light-levers, easy-access handles to add on to handle-less drawers and ten other designs that fit into popular Ikea items to make them easier for others to use. They are currently being worked on by Ikea Israel, in collaboration with nonprofits Milbat and Access Israel.