From PSFK's Shopper Data Debrief report, here's how today's brands and retailers are retaining valuable consumer data from in-store tracking technologies

Even in the age of ecommerce, the physical store remains an important tool for brands and retailers to interact with and engage shoppers, creating emotional connections in ways that they cannot online. New technologies allow retailers to track shoppers’ real-time in-store movements throughout the space at a more granular level, creating heatmaps that allow them to analyze shoppers’ behavior in more depth than ever before, measuring data like traffic flow, dwell times and product interactions.

These figures provide actionable insights that allow retailers to optimize store layout, pricing, merchandising and inventory management in order to best meet shoppers' needs. Here's how four innovative retailers have used in-store heatmapping, CCTV, floor sensors and more in order to determine shopper patterns, inform resource planning and ultimately improve the store experience:

Tencent YouTu Lab x Intel
Technology companies Intel and Tencent have partnered to develop a series of AI-powered products for retailers to collect actionable insights about customers to optimize service in real time. YouBox is an intelligent analytics framework that retailers can apply to legacy cameras. DeepGaze provides retailers with information about how shoppers move around the store and hotspots they visit. Smart cameras equipped with an Intel Movidius Myriad 2 vision processing unit (VPU) perform object detection and then transfer relevant data to Tencent’s cloud, which uses Intel processors for deeper analytics. Both of these products can help predict sales trends, optimize inventory management and help personalize and improve the customer experience.

JD.ID X-Mart
Chinese ecommerce company JD opened a cashierless store in Jakarta, Indonesia, that uses sophisticated technology to study shopper movements. Items are tracked by RFID, and cameras placed throughout the store track shoppers’ movements to generate store heat maps to monitor traffic, product selection and shopper preferences to help optimize inventory and displays. Facial recognition technology identifies shoppers as they leave, charging their credit card automatically for any items they take.

The Drug Store
Iris Nova, the parent company of direct-to-consumer beverage brand Dirty Lemon, has opened two cashier-less stores in New York City, which use heat map trackers to monitor shopper foot traffic as well as RFID-enabled refrigerators that track inventory sold and QR codes that prompt shoppers to pay via text message.

“Ultimately, what we're doing is we're building a data set around consumption behavior in the beverage space, which allows us to better serve our customers. All of the data that we're collecting and everything that we're doing with technology is really with the intention of providing a better, more streamlined experience for consumers to enjoy the brand that we've built,” says Zak Normandin, founder and CEO of Iris Nova.

For an extensive look into the ways in which retailers are creating a two-way value exchange with consumers around data, download PSFK's Shopper Data Debrief, out now.

The Shopper Data Debrief by business intelligence service PSFK outlines how retailers can leverage new tools to capture shopper data in the physical store, creating a mutually beneficial value exchange that allows them to refine operations and offer a more personalized in-store experience. This report is part of a series of reports focusing on retail innovation and customer experience to inspire the members of our business intelligence services.


Lead image: stock photos from Zapp2Photo/Shutterstock

Even in the age of ecommerce, the physical store remains an important tool for brands and retailers to interact with and engage shoppers, creating emotional connections in ways that they cannot online. New technologies allow retailers to track shoppers’ real-time in-store movements throughout the space at a more granular level, creating heatmaps that allow them to analyze shoppers’ behavior in more depth than ever before, measuring data like traffic flow, dwell times and product interactions.