From PSFK's Shopper Data Debrief, here's how today's leading brands are using RFID and related technologies to provide relevant recommendations and assistance in real-time

Consumers expect the physical shopping experience to be as convenient and responsive as the digital one. More than 50% of North American consumers said they are likely to purchase if stores offer interactive technologies. In response to this demand, retailers are using contextual targeting, employing RFID, machine vision and other technologies to detect items that shoppers are interacting with in order to provide assistance and recommendations for related products. In exchange, retailers can leverage real-time shopper data in order to target shoppers in the moment and drive incremental sales.

From PSFK's Shopper Data Debrief, here are three examples that demonstrate how contemporary brands are using digital tools to engage consumers with a personalized in-real-time shopping experience:

Adore Me x StoreAdvise
Lingerie retailer Adore Me has implemented tech-enabled dressing rooms that offer shoppers additional convenience and privacy while providing the retailer with data on customer behavior and preferences. Shoppers can request additional items via a smart display in the fitting room, eliminating the need to open the door while trying on intimates. Items are equipped with RFID tags, which are used to track which items shoppers bring into the dressing room, allowing AdoreMe to track the popularity of items and optimize inventory levels down to the individual store. The platform, created by software company StoreAdvise, generates reports based on the data collected by the in-store tools, and data can also be shared with the lingerie brands to give them insight into which items are most popular with customers.

Apricart
Maine-based startup Apricart has created an intelligent shopping cart that uses an unobtrusive camera system to scan items as shoppers add them to their carts in order to provide personalized shopper assistance and collect shopper data. Apricart can help shoppers locate items, remember shoppers’ frequently purchased items and provide recommendations based on the other items in their carts. It also allows shoppers to automatically pay for items simply by adding them to their carts, eliminating the checkout process. In addition to providing grocery shoppers with a personalized experience, Apricart’s proprietary system allows grocery retailers to collect in-moment data about shoppers’ paths to purchase, such as offering dynamic personalized promotions and receiving immediate feedback on their effectiveness.

Guess x Alibaba
Alibaba partnered with fashion brand Guess to pilot Alibaba’s first FashionAI concept store in Hong Kong featuring smart racks, smart mirrors and high-tech fitting rooms. Shoppers check in with a QR code or via facial recognition, and, as all items are RFID-enabled, when the shopper picks them up, they automatically appear in a smart mirror. The mirror subsequently suggests outfits to complete the look either based on the customer’s previous purchases or the store’s latest products. Shoppers can use the smart mirror to add items they would like to try on into a virtual shopping cart. If they cannot find what they are looking for in store, they can add clothing from other Taobao virtual stores via tablets.

Today's consumers expect their favorite brands to recognize their unique identity and anticipate their differentiated needs, but are wary of sharing the necessary data in order to do so. For a deep dive into the many ways in which retailers are leveraging digital strategies in order to gain consumer trust and build a mutually beneficial relationship, download PSFK's Shopper Data Debrief, available here.

The Shopper Data Debrief by business intelligence service PSFK outlines how retailers can leverage new tools to capture shopper data in the physical store, creating a mutually beneficial value exchange that allows them to refine operations and offer a more personalized in-store experience. This report is part of a series of reports focusing on retail innovation and customer experience to inspire the members of our business intelligence services.

Consumers expect the physical shopping experience to be as convenient and responsive as the digital one. More than 50% of North American consumers said they are likely to purchase if stores offer interactive technologies. In response to this demand, retailers are using contextual targeting, employing RFID, machine vision and other technologies to detect items that shoppers are interacting with in order to provide assistance and recommendations for related products. In exchange, retailers can leverage real-time shopper data in order to target shoppers in the moment and drive incremental sales.