The snack brand's augmented reality popup encouraged passersby to scan QR codes to reveal the sugar content of many popular processed foods from competitors like General Mills and Kellogg's

Consumers know that processed foods aren’t ideal, and can contain unhealthy additives and excess salt or sugar. But just how much sugar is hiding in the supposedly healthier options on the market today? Snack bar brand KIND created an augmented reality popup called Sweeteners Uncovered to reveal the not-so-sweet truth.

The two-day, New York City popup encouraged consumers to look not only at the sugar content of their favorite snacks with a simple QR scan, but also to compare them to traditional unhealthy ones. The popup also explained the many different sugars that might be hiding in the ingredients label, making it seem like there’s less sugar than there really is.

“While peoples’ focus surrounding sweeteners is increasing, there’s little understanding of how to identify them on food labels,” Stephanie Csaszar, dietitian and health & wellness expert at KIND, said in a statement. “Through this effort, we aim to bring greater awareness to the 100+ name variations and types of sweeteners and sugar sources found in foods that individuals might not realize they’re consuming daily.”

KIND directly compared “healthy” snacks from its competitors like Kellogg’s and General Mills, but the mission doesn’t end there: The brand has been petitioning the United States government to make the nutrition information on food package more transparent in general, in response to growing consumer concern.

KIND


Lead image: KIND Snacks via Facebook

Consumers know that processed foods aren’t ideal, and can contain unhealthy additives and excess salt or sugar. But just how much sugar is hiding in the supposedly healthier options on the market today? Snack bar brand KIND created an augmented reality popup called Sweeteners Uncovered to reveal the not-so-sweet truth.

The two-day, New York City popup encouraged consumers to look not only at the sugar content of their favorite snacks with a simple QR scan, but also to compare them to traditional unhealthy ones. The popup also explained the many different sugars that might be hiding in the ingredients label, making it seem like there’s less sugar than there really is.