A restaurant called Sushi Singularity is slated to open in Japan's capital city in 2020, using analysis of customers' saliva and more to 3D print sushi personalized to their body's needs

Tailoring diets to one's individual microbiome is a rising trend in the food and beverage space, with plenty of startups and doctors alike offering testing and custom meal plans. One Tokyo restaurant, created by Japanese design studio Open Meals, is giving the concept a high-end spin, offering personalized, 3D-printed sushi created in accordance with tests on customers' bodily fluids.

Named Sushi Singularity, the cutting-edge restaurant won't open until 2020. After making a reservation, customers will submit samples two weeks ahead of dining at the restaurant. When they arrive to dine, they will receive a menu designed for their specific nutritional needs based on their test results.

Open Meals admits it is yet to perfect the technology involved in the process of customizing the experience. While the idea of submitting urine samples to tailor a restaurant meal may seen off-putting to some, the establishment hopes to capitalize on the ever-growing popularity of consumer obsession with health, diet and personalization.

Open Meals


Lead image: stock photos from Stockmeinyk/Shutterstock

Tailoring diets to one's individual microbiome is a rising trend in the food and beverage space, with plenty of startups and doctors alike offering testing and custom meal plans. One Tokyo restaurant, created by Japanese design studio Open Meals, is giving the concept a high-end spin, offering personalized, 3D-printed sushi created in accordance with tests on customers' bodily fluids.

Named Sushi Singularity, the cutting-edge restaurant won't open until 2020. After making a reservation, customers will submit samples two weeks ahead of dining at the restaurant. When they arrive to dine, they will receive a menu designed for their specific nutritional needs based on their test results.