Joining the ranks of BMW and Cadillac, Enterprise is launching a subscription offer that caters to today's mobility-as-a-service climate

Enterprise Holdings (the parent company behind car rental brands such as Enterprise, National and Alamo) announced that it is rolling out a millennial-focused car rental subscription service in coming weeks.

Encouraging greater choice, flexibility and spontaneity for drivers, Enterprise Holdings plans to provide customers paying an all-inclusive monthly fee with a new ownership model that's slated to make some ripples. Customers can more easily swap out vehicles (up to four times a month) and they can pick from some 20 brands and models. The company has not announced details regarding the price point, likely due to auto brands receiving significant resistance from dealerships when trying to develop and launch their own Netflix-style services.

Nonetheless, the company joins the many auto brands like BMW, Volvo and Cadillac also rolling out subscription offers that prioritize flexibility for today's drivers. “Enterprise Holdings continues to succeed in the highly competitive mobility sector because we understand how and where customer service and innovation intersect,” said Randal Narike, EVP of operations for Enterprise Holdings. “Introducing new programs like vehicle subscription is just one more example of that mindset.”

Enterprise


Lead image: stock photos from mimagephotography/Shutterstock

Enterprise Holdings (the parent company behind car rental brands such as Enterprise, National and Alamo) announced that it is rolling out a millennial-focused car rental subscription service in coming weeks.

Encouraging greater choice, flexibility and spontaneity for drivers, Enterprise Holdings plans to provide customers paying an all-inclusive monthly fee with a new ownership model that's slated to make some ripples. Customers can more easily swap out vehicles (up to four times a month) and they can pick from some 20 brands and models. The company has not announced details regarding the price point, likely due to auto brands receiving significant resistance from dealerships when trying to develop and launch their own Netflix-style services.