From PSFK's Back-To-School Deck, here's how two companies are adapting to the needs of their customers by renting out their merchandise

Whether it’s a helping hand, a ride downtown, or even a vacation home, the access economy has completely transformed the way that consumers shop for goods and services. The idea of sharing is hardly a fresh one, but certain brands and services are embracing the practice in new ways and integrating it into their business models, especially considering the fact that today’s customers want an easy experience and a smaller price tag.

The Ubers and the Airbnbs of the world are widely accepted and used by consumers. But an emerging class of access providers—ones whose merchandise is usually bought, not rented—is taking retail across verticals by storm. Here are two brands doing so:

Rent the Runway
Although Rent the Runway has already found a loyal following of stylish adults, its latest venture is intended for an entirely new demographic: kids. Instead of buying expensive outfits for children who might outgrow them at any second, parents can now use RTR Kids to borrow pint-sized dresses and jackets from brands like Fendi and Marc Jacobs.

IKEA
Swedish furniture retailer IKEA isn’t only innovative in its design ethos—the brand is now updating its model by renting out select pieces, like chairs and desks, in certain markets. The brand is currently the world’s largest seller of furniture, so this move could eventually make a huge impact on the global furnishings market.

For a deep dive into the many ways in which today’s brands are making their business models more flexible and catering to the ways consumers want to use services and products, download PSFK’s Back-To-School Deck, out now.


Lead image: stock photos from Creative Lab/Shutterstock

Whether it’s a helping hand, a ride downtown, or even a vacation home, the access economy has completely transformed the way that consumers shop for goods and services. The idea of sharing is hardly a fresh one, but certain brands and services are embracing the practice in new ways and integrating it into their business models, especially considering the fact that today’s customers want an easy experience and a smaller price tag.

The Ubers and the Airbnbs of the world are widely accepted and used by consumers. But an emerging class of access providers—ones whose merchandise is usually bought, not rented—is taking retail across verticals by storm. Here are two brands doing so: