From PSFK's Back-To-School Deck, here's how two brands are using thrifting to restructure how customers return unwanted items, catering to increased consumer interest in circular apparel

Consumer attitudes around thrifting have continued to evolve, especially in the past few years. Now, younger consumers prioritize sustainability and economy when purchasing apparel, and accordingly are incorporating more secondhand clothing and accessories into their wardrobes.

On an individual level, secondhand shoppers can search the racks to find unique, expressive pieces at relatively cheap prices. On a larger scale, fast fashion can be detrimental to the environment—by encouraging reuse, stores offering consignment shrinks their carbon footprint. The following brands are putting their own spin on thrifting, breathing new life into the customer experience:

American Eagle and Urban Necessities
Clothing retailer American Eagle has long been popular with younger consumers. To cater to an audience that’s craving a new type of shopping experience, the brand’s SoHo location opened a popup store in collaboration with Urban Necessities, a Las Vegas-based streetwear reseller, in March. Inside the 1,900-square-foot space, customers can shop for secondhand kicks and custom merchandise, allowing shoppers to emphasize their individuality.

 

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& Other Stories and Sellpy
H&M Group brand & Other Stories is a womenswear retailer aimed at millennial and Gen-Z shoppers. In order to promote second lives for its unwanted clothes, & Other Stories has partnered with Sellpy, a Swedish online consignment platform, on a custom site that exclusively features the brand’s merchandise sold by and to consumers. Just like that, they’re keeping more clothes in closets and out of landfills.

H&M

For a deep dive into the many ways in which today’s brands are appealing to teens and children, download PSFK’s Back-To-School Deck, out now.


Lead image: stock photos from Speedkinz/Shutterstock

Consumer attitudes around thrifting have continued to evolve, especially in the past few years. Now, younger consumers prioritize sustainability and economy when purchasing apparel, and accordingly are incorporating more secondhand clothing and accessories into their wardrobes.

On an individual level, secondhand shoppers can search the racks to find unique, expressive pieces at relatively cheap prices. On a larger scale, fast fashion can be detrimental to the environment—by encouraging reuse, stores offering consignment shrinks their carbon footprint. The following brands are putting their own spin on thrifting, breathing new life into the customer experience: