Stonewall Forever is a digital and AR experience that takes viewers through the events of the uprising that led to the modern LGBTQ rights movement, and invites them to add their own story to the mix

June marks 50 years since the Stonewall Riots, the historic uprising that catapulted the need for LGBTQ rights into the public sphere. To commemorate the legendary moment, Manhattan's Stonewall National Monument debuted a digital rebrand on Tuesday that make it possible for anyone to visit the site of the riots, just in time for Pride season.

Stonewall Forever, created by New York City’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center in partnership with Google, is available as both a website and a mobile app on Android and iOS. It's a powerful project that uses emerging tech to weave together oral histories, videos, photos and historic accounts to tell the stories of the people who fought back against police and social oppression, including early trans activists Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.

Google's AR allows visitors to the Stonewall National Monument to see a towering collection of glowing shapes, each embedded with their own piece of history. Anyone is welcome to leave their own stories on one of the shapes, and celebrities like singer Greyson Chance, comedian Lea DeLaria and Queer Eye‘s Antoni Porowski have already shared messages of support and reverence for the participants of the Stonewall Riots. Through first-person accounts and AR, Stonewall Forever transcends the limitations of a physical monument, providing this history to anyone with internet access.

Stonewall Forever


Lead image: stock photos from ginamcleanphoto/Shutterstock

June marks 50 years since the Stonewall Riots, the historic uprising that catapulted the need for LGBTQ rights into the public sphere. To commemorate the legendary moment, Manhattan's Stonewall National Monument debuted a digital rebrand on Tuesday that make it possible for anyone to visit the site of the riots, just in time for Pride season.

Stonewall Forever, created by New York City’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center in partnership with Google, is available as both a website and a mobile app on Android and iOS. It's a powerful project that uses emerging tech to weave together oral histories, videos, photos and historic accounts to tell the stories of the people who fought back against police and social oppression, including early trans activists Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.