The experiential exhibition includes 32 pieces from the museum's collection and allows visitors to both hear and see artwork in an immersive environment

Consumers visiting an art museum can usually expect a visual experience, but thanks to the imagination of British artist Oliver Beer, the Met is currently putting on an experiential sound exhibit, pushing the boundaries of the art world.

Through August 11, visitors can experience Vessel Orchestra, which uses 32 pieces from the museum's collection and positions them to produce specific sound waves, which in turn creates a musical effect. On top of this, musicians perform every Friday night using the vessels, reassessing what art exhibits can present to consumers and how experiential exhibits work.

This piece joins other experiential exhibits like Death is Elsewhere, a video installation that presents a 360-degree musical and visual display. Traditionally a visual experience, the Met is expanding what it offers to visitors by targeting new senses, making way for other exhibits—and retail applications—that stun audiences with their audacity.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Lead image: stock photos from mariakraynova/Shutterstock

Consumers visiting an art museum can usually expect a visual experience, but thanks to the imagination of British artist Oliver Beer, the Met is currently putting on an experiential sound exhibit, pushing the boundaries of the art world.

Through August 11, visitors can experience Vessel Orchestra, which uses 32 pieces from the museum's collection and positions them to produce specific sound waves, which in turn creates a musical effect. On top of this, musicians perform every Friday night using the vessels, reassessing what art exhibits can present to consumers and how experiential exhibits work.