The pop-up space is both an installation and a store aimed at educating customers how to make the most of the products they already own

It's fair to say that most retailers want their customers to walk away with as much product as possible. After all, that's the model that works best for the bottom line. But Good Stuff, a pop-up store in New York City's Seaport District, is taking a completely different approach.

Part installation and part retailer, Good Stuff is a concept store that actively encourages the circular economy—a mode of thinking that minimizes waste and reuses resources as much as possible. The space, which closed on June 28 after a month-long installation, is the work of Fixup, an organization that hosts repair and reuse events to dissuade consumers from buying more products.

The space is set up like a normal store, but with some notable changes. Sales associates leave guests alone, letting them float through the two-floor pop-up and read tags that double as detailed descriptions of each circular brand or item. The products are a mix of new and upcycled; unused items come from ethical brands, while pre-used items are like new or have been or restored to their original forms. Anyone can drop off clothes and shoes to donate.

Sandra Goldmark, the founder of Fixup, aims for her organization to teach fixing skills to New Yorkers, a famously consumption-loving population. Founded in 2013, the group has already diverted 10,000 pound of waste from landfills.

“Some visitors are already engaged in questions of consumption and social or environmental impact, some are not, but all are interested in talking about the topic,” she says. “We also aim to demonstrate for other businesses that it is possible—and appealing to consumers—to develop multiple revenue streams: good new products, good used items, and good fixes, or repair, service and maintenance.”

Good Stuff also hosts events focused on fixing broken items or upcycling waste into new products. The store sells and displays a wide range of products, like clothes from Goodwill, leather wallets, high-fashion dresses, bedding, drinkware and home decor.

Each tag includes a product description and a QR code leading to more information, and some even include the names of an item's previous owner. Good Stuff might even prefer if shoppers walk away with nothing—Fixup's goal is to educate more than to sell.

“People are hungry for a better system,” Goldmark says. “It's just up to us to make it convenient, accessible, and appealing.”

Fixup

It's fair to say that most retailers want their customers to walk away with as much product as possible. After all, that's the model that works best for the bottom line. But Good Stuff, a pop-up store in New York City's Seaport District, is taking a completely different approach.

Part installation and part retailer, Good Stuff is a concept store that actively encourages the circular economy—a mode of thinking that minimizes waste and reuses resources as much as possible. The space, which closed on June 28 after a month-long installation, is the work of Fixup, an organization that hosts repair and reuse events to dissuade consumers from buying more products.