Almost 40 of Olafur Eliasson's works have been gathered in his latest exhibition, allowing guests to interact with recreated environments

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has created immersive, interactive pieces for decades, allowing viewers to engage with art in new ways. But at his latest exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, the artist's work is intended to inspire more than just wonder—it's meant to spur action.

Photo: Anders Sune Berg. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York/Los Angeles. © 2014 Olafur Eliasson

Nearly 40 of the artist's works have been assembled in order to prompt visitors to consider their impact on the environment. The installation, called Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life, includes pieces like an indoor rainbow, illuminated water and a fog-filled tunnel. By allowing interaction with these microcosms, Eliasson and the Tate hope to make a point that people have much the same effect on the natural world, including climate change, energy and migration.

Consumers are increasingly responding to experiential retail and installations, and combining this with a sustainable message is likely to draw even more visitors. Artists and spaces are able to make a statement when done correctly, and In Real Life is poised to do just that. The exhibition, which opens in mid-July, will run at the Tate Modern until January 2020.

Photographer: Jens Ziehe. Boros Collection, Berlin. © 2002 Olafur Eliasson

Tate Modern


Lead image: Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2017. © 2014 Olafur Eliasson

All images via The Tate press release

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has created immersive, interactive pieces for decades, allowing viewers to engage with art in new ways. But at his latest exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, the artist's work is intended to inspire more than just wonder—it's meant to spur action.

Photo: Anders Sune Berg. Courtesy of the artist; neugerriemschneider, Berlin; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York/Los Angeles. © 2014 Olafur Eliasson

Nearly 40 of the artist's works have been assembled in order to prompt visitors to consider their impact on the environment. The installation, called Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life, includes pieces like an indoor rainbow, illuminated water and a fog-filled tunnel. By allowing interaction with these microcosms, Eliasson and the Tate hope to make a point that people have much the same effect on the natural world, including climate change, energy and migration.