Platforms that allow buyers and sellers to interact online are becoming increasingly popular, driven by young shoppers who prefer social retail experiences

Not too long ago, part of the appeal of ecommerce was the ability to avoid talking to anyone. Instead of shopping in-store and speaking with sales associates, consumers could avoid that stress entirely from the comfort of their homes. But now, through the power of peer-driven marketplaces, young consumers are searching for a way to make ecommerce social again.

With the success of sites like Depop, it's clear that peer-to-peer ecommerce fills a need. Now, other retailers and platforms are starting to adopt this strategy with strong results. And thanks to easy-to-use interfaces, sellers can make money while also allowing buyers to save some on secondhand items.

Depop
In many ways, Depop is the finest example of a peer-driven marketplace. When they sign up for the app, users are automatically given access to their own “store,” which they can fill with pre-worn items or their own designs, or even ignore entirely. The main feed is made up of posts from followed accounts like Instagram, except everything is for sale.

Depop

21 Buttons
This Barcelona startup combines social media with ecommerce. Influencers use the app to post pictures, and using an in-app scanner, they tag all of the apparel they're wearing. Rather than selling that exact piece, the 21 Buttons instead links to that item online, where users can buy it. Posters can earn commission when items are sold.

Yeay
Yeay is kind of like a mix between Snapchat and ecommerce. Users are encouraged to create videos in which they describe how much they enjoy certain products, which are available online. When users post or interact with videos, they gain points which they can then use to buy featured products.

Shopee
Shopee is an ecommerce website, but one of its key applications takes place on Instagram. By integrating the site with the social network, users transform their profiles into peer-driven marketplaces by taking pictures of items they want to sell and posting them on Instagram. Buyers can then chat with sellers and make purchases through the app.


Lead image: Depop

Not too long ago, part of the appeal of ecommerce was the ability to avoid talking to anyone. Instead of shopping in-store and speaking with sales associates, consumers could avoid that stress entirely from the comfort of their homes. But now, through the power of peer-driven marketplaces, young consumers are searching for a way to make ecommerce social again.

With the success of sites like Depop, it's clear that peer-to-peer ecommerce fills a need. Now, other retailers and platforms are starting to adopt this strategy with strong results. And thanks to easy-to-use interfaces, sellers can make money while also allowing buyers to save some on secondhand items.