The tech giant is now venturing into banking with the Apple Card, an online-first credit card that's available to all of its U.S. users

Many of us trust Apple with our personal technology, from phones to computers to headphones. But now, the tech company is taking a huge step into banking with the launch of its very own digital-first credit card, which on Tuesday was made available to each of its U.S. customers.

The Apple Card has two manifestations: a primary, online version that lives on users' phones and an optional, physical card that can be delivered on request. The digital card is accepted everywhere that takes Apple Pay, while the physical card works in places that don't yet boast that capability. It's meant primarily as a backup—users get 2% Daily Cash, or cash back, on iPhone purchases, but only 1% on ones that use the physical card.

Apple is marketing the card on both its ease of use and its security, and it's hard to argue with either of those points. Used with an iPhone, the card is just as secure as anything else on a mobile device, and practically everyone owns a smartphone at this point. The physical version, too, is designed to be secure, with no information other than the customer's name printed on the titanium card.

With this move, the tech giant is integrating itself even more into daily life, expanding into an entirely new sector. With features designed to reduce interest and encourage healthy spending habits, Apple is hoping that its users will start to rethink their reliance on banks and place more trust in the corporations they already use. Apple Card is now available through the Wallet app.

Apple

Apple Card


Lead image: Apple

Many of us trust Apple with our personal technology, from phones to computers to headphones. But now, the tech company is taking a huge step into banking with the launch of its very own digital-first credit card, which on Tuesday was made available to each of its U.S. customers.

The Apple Card has two manifestations: a primary, online version that lives on users' phones and an optional, physical card that can be delivered on request. The digital card is accepted everywhere that takes Apple Pay, while the physical card works in places that don't yet boast that capability. It's meant primarily as a backup—users get 2% Daily Cash, or cash back, on iPhone purchases, but only 1% on ones that use the physical card.