Previously unused or fallow areas can become innovative gathering spaces and homes, promoting community and social good

As cities grow, their denizens are getting more and more innovative in the approach to using public spaces. Now, unoccupied spaces are being developed into areas where people can relax, meet and live their lives—all in places that were previously left fallow. From utilizing rental cars to building on rooftops, these brands are maximizing spaces to the benefit of their communities.

Parasitic House
In an effort to combat the lack of urban housing, the architecture firm El Sindicato Arquitectura created a new project: the Parasitic House. Looking toward rooftops to make up for the lack of space, the firm converted an urban rooftop into a living space. The prototype is a 39-square-foot, A-frame house, which holds a small kitchen, lofted bed, bathroom and leisure area.

CultureHouse
Inspired by public spaces in Copenhagen, Somerville-based CultureHouse designed a pop-up space in an empty storefront in Boston. Created as a gathering space for the community, it offers a place to watch sporting and cultural events together, plus free air conditioning and WiFi. Visitors can use it both for work and entertainment.

Orix x Times24 Co. 
Car sharing services Orix and Times24Co. noticed that their consumers were renting cars, but not driving them. To better understand their intentions, the automobile-sharing services conducted a survey. The results showed that some customers rented cars for almost everything except driving, including naps, work, storage, charging and more.

Atlanta Edible Forest
A volunteer coalition in Atlanta turned a vacant pecan farm into a 7-acre edible forest to provide free food to local residents. The goal was to provide the community with access to fresh produce in a food desert, where a third of the population lives below the poverty line. Now, the land is the nation’s largest edible forest, and community volunteers maintain the land.


Lead image: ROOM/Unsplashorix

As cities grow, their denizens are getting more and more innovative in the approach to using public spaces. Now, unoccupied spaces are being developed into areas where people can relax, meet and live their lives—all in places that were previously left fallow. From utilizing rental cars to building on rooftops, these brands are maximizing spaces to the benefit of their communities.

Parasitic House In an effort to combat the lack of urban housing, the architecture firm El Sindicato Arquitectura created a new project: the Parasitic House. Looking toward rooftops to make up for the lack of space, the firm converted an urban rooftop into a living space. The prototype is a 39-square-foot, A-frame house, which holds a small kitchen, lofted bed, bathroom and leisure area.