The e-tailer is looking to grow its support of local communities, designing rooftop gardens that produce thousands of pounds of organic produce—all for donation

Looking to give back to the communities where its employees live and work, Amazon began a partnership with nonprofit FareStart back in 2018, leveraging existing locations in its Seattle campus for an unlikely purpose: rooftop crop growing. The e-tailer enlisted its horticulture team to create full-fledged facilities across three buildings, and is currently reaping its harvest. The beautiful and functional gardens are now capable of producing thousands of pounds of organic food per year.

Vegetation grown ranges from carrots and peppers to eggplant, zucchini, beetroot and various salad greens. The gardens also serve as a pilot for Amazon's larger Urban Agriculture Program, a 150-yard farm-to-table experience that works to demonstrate the circular nature of composting. The project currently takes waste from cafeterias and kitchens around the Seattle campus and reuses it to fertilize the burgeoning sky gardens.

Employees of the campus had to be discouraged from eating the bountiful and pesticide-free crops, as Amazon planned to donate all yields to FareStart's charitable initiatives that fight homelessness and hunger. The nonprofit's programs include a network of restaurants, cafes, catering and more that provide food to Seattle community services like shelters and schools, and give participants the skills and work experience they need to combat joblessness. While only the green beginnings for its gardens in the sky, Amazon has high hopes to continue the project's growth across its facilities, and for it to serve as a proving ground for the future of urban farming.

Amazon | FareStart

Looking to give back to the communities where its employees live and work, Amazon began a partnership with nonprofit FareStart back in 2018, leveraging existing locations in its Seattle campus for an unlikely purpose: rooftop crop growing. The e-tailer enlisted its horticulture team to create full-fledged facilities across three buildings, and is currently reaping its harvest. The beautiful and functional gardens are now capable of producing thousands of pounds of organic food per year.

Vegetation grown ranges from carrots and peppers to eggplant, zucchini, beetroot and various salad greens. The gardens also serve as a pilot for Amazon's larger Urban Agriculture Program, a 150-yard farm-to-table experience that works to demonstrate the circular nature of composting. The project currently takes waste from cafeterias and kitchens around the Seattle campus and reuses it to fertilize the burgeoning sky gardens.