While it might sound strange at first, Audi offshoot Holoride now allows passengers to experience VR that is influenced by a car's motions

Time in cars is often endured rather than enjoyed. But tech startup Holoride is out to shake things up with a brand-new system that allows VR to sync seamlessly with the motions of a vehicle. It sounds strange, but the company's tech is already inside some Audis, Fords and Porsches—and it's only growing.

Holoride works by connecting car feedback to a VR headset, which generates graphics based on the vehicle's motions. Thanks to this tech, users can play games and explore worlds that match up exactly with the motions of the real world, making the experience one of the most immersive currently available.

This fall, the tech is being made available to the public through a partnership with Ford and Universal Studios. At the studio's CityWalk in Los Angeles, visitors can take a free, 10-minute ride through a “Bride of Frankenstein” VR experience. Elsewhere, Holoride partnered with Porsche and Discovery Channel for a “edutainment” test drive.

Holoride

Founded by three Audi executives, Holoride maintains that its system shouldn't cause carsickness. Because it mimics the real world with virtually no latency, there's less potential to feel nauseated. In a survey, the company reports that 53% of users experienced no sickness—a figure made more impressive by the fact that only 18% reported that they never experience carsickness.

Holoride is still a long way from being in the back of every vehicle. But its early activations are proof positive that even though VR never took off in the way it was hoped to, cars could become a more natural home for the tech. Audi's spinoff could transform cars into immersive entertainment centers.

Holoride


Lead image: Raphael Schaller/Unsplash

Time in cars is often endured rather than enjoyed. But tech startup Holoride is out to shake things up with a brand-new system that allows VR to sync seamlessly with the motions of a vehicle. It sounds strange, but the company's tech is already inside some Audis, Fords and Porsches—and it's only growing.

Holoride works by connecting car feedback to a VR headset, which generates graphics based on the vehicle's motions. Thanks to this tech, users can play games and explore worlds that match up exactly with the motions of the real world, making the experience one of the most immersive currently available.