The startup credit union hopes to empower its community with cooperative funding that takes alternative spiritual practices seriously

Banking can and should be optimized for specific kinds of customers—recent upstarts like Brex and GRIND prove that this kind of tailoring can yield incredible results. Now, a fledgling credit union is taking client specificity to new extremes, and making the world of banking a bit more magical in the process.

The aptly-named Pagan Credit Union, which is currently in the planning stages, aims to be the first banking solution for the people of the spiritual practices that make up the Pagan community. The proposal might sound like the setup for a joke, but there's a great deal of need among this subset of consumers. Many don't have the credit history on which many larger banks base financial decisions, and there's a stigma associated with the practice.

“When it comes to our finances [Pagans] don’t always have the best track record. There’s kind of a transient aspect to our culture,” credit union founder Jason Fletcher told The Outline. “If someone wanted to finance a temple for example, a traditional bank would probably laugh you right out of the door—but a Pagan credit union wouldn’t.”

The credit union is still searching for members and federal approval, but a growing interest in community-led, cooperative banking is giving the operation a much-needed boost. Banking is so much more than an exchange of money, and the Pagan Credit Union is working to provide its community with the resources it deserves.

Pagan Credit Union


Lead image: Nathan Dumlao/Unsplash

Banking can and should be optimized for specific kinds of customers—recent upstarts like Brex and GRIND prove that this kind of tailoring can yield incredible results. Now, a fledgling credit union is taking client specificity to new extremes, and making the world of banking a bit more magical in the process.

The aptly-named Pagan Credit Union, which is currently in the planning stages, aims to be the first banking solution for the people of the spiritual practices that make up the Pagan community. The proposal might sound like the setup for a joke, but there's a great deal of need among this subset of consumers. Many don't have the credit history on which many larger banks base financial decisions, and there's a stigma associated with the practice.