PSFK Picks: Top Five Health Innovations Of The Week

PSFK Picks: Top Five Health Innovations Of The Week

Medical goggles that give doctors x-ray vision and rings that interpret sign language. Innovative stories from the world of wellness.

  • 24 december 2013

Each week with its partner Boehringer Ingelheim brings you a snapshot of five innovative ideas that are reshaping the health care industry. This week’s innovations include medical goggles that give doctors x-ray vision and rings that interpret sign language.


Medical Glasses Let Nurses See Patients’ Veins Through Their Skin
Evena Medical has recently unveiled a pair of glasses that can ‘see through’ skin, and make it easier for doctors and nurses to find the veins in patient’s arms. The Eyes-On Glasses use the company’s patented near-infrared (NIR) visualization technology, and aims to make procedures like injections and intravenous catheters much easier. It’s a development that means doctors and nurses can get their job done more efficiently, while patients don’t have to endure as much pain. Eyes-On Glasses can also transmit the images viewed to remote locations via Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and 3G. Combined with the glasses’ two-way audio conferencing capability and built-in storage for photos and videos, the technology could also open up training possibilities and faster communication.


Fitness Apparel Line Offers A Holistic Way To Track Health
University of Waterloo college students Dhananja Jayalath and Christopher Wiebe have developed a new type of workout clothing called Athos, which can track the wearer’s muscle groups, heart rate, and breathing level. The clothing uses electromyography, or EMG, to measure and evaluate electrical signals generated by muscles. With EMG, electrode adhesive sensors are put on the muscle to collect electricity and raw signals, which are built into a compression suit that transmits muscle data to a small module, called the core. This core then wirelessly syncs this data to Athos’ software app, which collects all information and actually gives users a way to track and understand their workouts.


Adaptive Room Personalizes Its Settings To Soothe Workplace Stress
Philips has created a healing room in collaboration with a team of academics and professionals in mental health, which is able to adapt to meet individual stress-relieving needs. Depending on where users stand, the room changes its shape and soundscapes to create new calming ambient experiences. Three key themes are introduced in order to reduce people’s stress levels: paced breathing, personal balance, and ambient experience. Embedded sensors under the soft flooring of this high-tech sanctuary trigger space partitions that enclose different areas. The open space is built to combat various work-related tensions such as burnout and anxiety, and the innovative space could be adapted to fit perfectly in hospitals, mental health facilities and even airports.


Rings Turn Sign Language Into Spoken Work To Help The Deaf Communicate
The Sign Language Ring is a translation device that takes the form of a bracelet with a set of detachable rings worn on different fingers. Winner of the Red Dot design award this year, it detects and tracks signing motions, translating them to voice which is emitted by the bracelet. The system also translates voice into text, which is displayed on a screen on the top of the bracelet. The user can pre-record their movements and assign the appropriate words, which allows the system to be customized to the user’s particular gestures. After use, the rings can be set into the bracelet for storage.


Honey Bees Trained To Detect Cancer On Patients’ Breath
New research from Inscentinel, a UK-based firm specializing in insect research, suggests that honey bees can be trained to detect certain early-stage cancers in humans. Using this breakthrough, Portuguese designer Susana Soares developed a concept device that can detect cancer and other diseases through scent using honey bees that have been trained to do so. The bees in Soares’s project were trained to detect odors associated with lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer and other diseases like tuberculosis. The project consists of glass orbs with two chambers: the bees are placed in the larger chamber, and as the patient exhales into the device, the bees detect disease and rush into the smaller chamber. The device could provide a more holistic  and less invasive way to detect life-threatening illnesses.

PSFK has partnered with  Boehringer Ingelheim to bring you a steady stream of inspiring news and ideas in the health and wellness space. Once each week, we will be posting an article on If you would like to gain access to the full stream of content, please check out Boehringer Ingelheim’s Facebook Page, where they are publishing a regular stream of inspiring and informative content.


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