Our Food Debrief looks at how the grocery industry is using flexible delivery options to fit into consumers' schedules

In an age where consumers can buy anything imaginable with the click of a mouse or a tap on their phone, grocers are looking to extend their fulfillment options beyond in-store pickup or scheduled home deliveries. In this new age of convenience, scheduled home routines deliver food as close to the point of consumption as possible. And thanks to innovations in IoT and automation, brands can scale last-mile deliveries that work around customer schedules or deliver directly to their fridge.

Grocery Home Delivery

Expanding delivery options is vital for grocers looking to maintain a competitive edge, but there’s still a large gap between what consumers want and what grocers are currently providing. According to a 2017 survey by Grocery eCommerce, 68% of online grocery shoppers said they were somewhat or very likely to switch grocers to one with a better overall online shopping experience and process. But according to data from Accenture Consulting, only 52% of shoppers reported having their expectations met by current delivery options provided by retailers.

The challenge—and the opportunity—for retailers is thus to expand delivery options to include a wide variety of fulfillment partners (automated, IoT, sharing economy, and others) that allow customers the flexibility to choose the method that best fits their lifestyle. One example of a major grocery chain collaborating with delivery partners is Kroger, which is now testing online order delivery using local Uber drivers. When customers order using ClickList, Kroger’s online ordering platform, they have the option to select delivery by an Uber driver, rather than picking up the order in store. This not only better meets the needs of Kroger’s customers but saves the company the cost and effort of having to establish its own delivery network.

In Sweden, meanwhile, supermarket chain ICA is also making use of innovative delivery strategies and leaning on partnerships to help bolster its offerings to customers. Working with smart home device company Glue and delivery provider PostNord, ICA customers can have groceries delivered right to their kitchens, even when they aren’t home to receive them. Customers who have Glue’s smart lock on their homes can grant temporary access to PostNord couriers to deliver groceries from ICA directly to their fridge, eliminating the time wasted waiting at home for a grocery delivery to arrive.

PSFK’s Food Debrief explores how grocery retailers are revolutionizing proactive and responsive convenience for their customers, setting a frictionless standard for all consumer-facing industries. Download the full report here, or request a meeting for your office. For full access to all of PSFK’s reports, debriefs, articles and archives, become a PSFK Member today.

In an age where consumers can buy anything imaginable with the click of a mouse or a tap on their phone, grocers are looking to extend their fulfillment options beyond in-store pickup or scheduled home deliveries. In this new age of convenience, scheduled home routines deliver food as close to the point of consumption as possible. And thanks to innovations in IoT and automation, brands can scale last-mile deliveries that work around customer schedules or deliver directly to their fridge.

Expanding delivery options is vital for grocers looking to maintain a competitive edge, but there’s still a large gap between what consumers want and what grocers are currently providing. According to a 2017 survey by Grocery eCommerce, 68% of online grocery shoppers said they were somewhat or very likely to switch grocers to one with a better overall online shopping experience and process. But according to data from Accenture Consulting, only 52% of shoppers reported having their expectations met by current delivery options provided by retailers.